The following work is done by JungHee Lee and Daniel Oh

ACT III SCENE V

Gloucester’s castle. ( p53)

Enter CORNWALL and EDMUND

[CORNWALL and EDMUND enter]

CORNWALL (original):
I will have my revenge ere I depart his house.

CORNWALL (translation):
I’m gonna revenge before I leave this house

EDMUND (original):
How, my lord, I may be censured, that nature thus
gives way to loyalty, something fears me to think
of.

EDMUND (translation):
I’m scared that I might be criticized for choosing my loyalty for you over my father.

CORNWALL (original):
I now perceive, it was not altogether your
brother’s evil disposition made him seek his death;
but a provoking merit, set a-work by a reprovable badness in himself.

CORNWALL (translation):
Coming to think about it, I think that your brother’s evil intentions, after all, was not because he was a evil man. It’s your father who is so evil.

EDMUND (original):
How malicious is my fortune, that I must repent to
be just! This is the letter he spoke of, which
approves him an intelligent party to the advantages
of France: O heavens! that this treason were not,
or not I the detector!

EDMUND (translation):
What’s wrong with my luck, now that I have to be sorry for being just!! This is the letter he was talking about that says that he was a spy of France. Oh my god, I wish this wasn’t true or I wasn’t the one to discover this!

CORNWALL (original):
o with me to the duchess.

CORNWALL (translation):
Let’s go to the duchess.

EDMUND (original):
If the matter of this paper be certain, you have
mighty business in hand.

EDMUND (translation):
If this letter is true, you really have some heavy business going on.

CORNWALL (original):
True or false, it hath made thee earl of
Gloucester. Seek out where thy father is, that he
may be ready for our apprehension.

CORNWALL (translation):
Whether it’s true or not, you’re now the Earl of Gloucester. Go to your father and let him know that he’s gonna be arrested.

EDMUND (original):
Aside
Stuff his suspicion more fully. –I will persevere
in my course of loyalty, though the conflict be sore
between that and my blood.

EDMUND (translation):
[Aside]
If I find him helping the king, Cornwall will suspect him even more. I’ll act for my loyalty even if that hurts me for betraying my own father.

CORNWALL (original):
I will lay trust upon thee; and thou shalt find a
dearer father in my love.
Exeunt

CORNWALL (translation):
I believe you, and I’ll be a better father than Gloucester.

[Exit]


P54.
ACT III SCENE IV A chamber in a farmhouse adjoining the castle.

Enter GLOUCESTER, KING LEAR, KENT, Fool, and EDGAR

[GLOUCESTER, KING LEAR, KENT, Fool, and EDGAR enter]

GLOUCESTER (original):
Here is better than the open air; take it
thankfully. I will piece out the comfort with what
addition I can: I will not be long from you.

GLOUCESTER (translation):
It’s better than being outside; be thankful. I’ll do my best for your comfort. I’ll be back soon.

KENT (original):
All the power of his wits have given way to his
impatience: the gods reward your kindness!
Exit GLOUCESTER

KENT (translation):
He lost his patience because he’s just too sad. God bless you.

[GLOUCESTER exits]

EDGAR (original):
Frateretto calls me; and tells me
Nero is an angler in the lake of darkness.
Pray, innocent, and beware the foul fiend.

EDGAR (translation):
Frateretto is saying that Nero is a fisherman in the lake of darkness. You better pray, naïve people, and watch out the devil.

Fool (original):
Prithee, nuncle, tell me whether a madman be a
gentleman or a yeoman?

Fool (translation):
Uncle, is this crazy guy a noble man or just a low class person?

KING LEAR (original):
A king, a king!

KING LEAR (translation):
A king, a king!

Fool (original):
No, here’s a yeoman that has a gentleman to his son;
for he’s a mad yeoman that sees his son a gentleman
before him.

Fool (translation):
No, he’s a low class person whose son is noble; he’s crazy because his son became noble even before him.

KING LEAR (original):
To have a thousand with red burning spits
Come hissing in upon ‘em, --

KING LEAR (translation):
Thousands of devils with red hot nods are coming to get them!

EDGAR (original):
The foul fiend bites my back.

EDGAR (translation):
The devil is biting my back.

Fool (original):
He’s mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a
horse’s health, a boy’s love, or a whore’s oath.

Fool (translation):
You’re crazy to believe such a blatant lie.

KING LEAR (original):
It shall be done; I will arraign them to straight.
To EDGAR
Come, sit thou here, most learned justicer;
To the Fool
Thou, sapient sir, sit here. Now, you she foxes!

KING LEAR (translation):
Okay, let’s do it. I’ll have them tried right now.
[To EDGAR]
Come here and sit, judge.
[To the Fool]
And you sit here, wise man. Now, she tricks you!

EDGAR (original):
Look, where he stands and glares!
Wantest thou eyes at trial, madam?
Come o’er the bourn, Bessy, to me,--

EDGAR (translation):
Look where he’s standing and staring at! Are you watching this, madam?
Bessy, come over the stream to me.

Fool (original):
Her boat hath a leak,
And she must not speak
Why she dares not come over to thee.

Fool (translation):
Her boat is leaking and she must not speak why she wouldn’t come over to you.

EDGAR (original):
The foul fiend haunts poor Tom in the voice of a
nightingale. Hopdance cries in Tom’s belly for two
white herring. Croak not, black angel; I have no
food for thee.

EDGAR (translation):
The devil tries to haunt me with his nightingale-like voice. Hopdance is in my belly and crying for two white herring (a kind of fish). Stop it, devil; I don’t have any food.

KENT (original):
How do you, sir? Stand you not so amazed:
Will you lie down and rest upon the cushions?

KENT (translation):
How are you sir? Don’t stand there being so amazed. Lie down on the cushions.

KING LEAR (original):
I’ll see their trial first. Bring in the evidence.
To EDGAR
Thou robed man of justice, take thy place;
To the Fool
And thou, his yoke-fellow of equity,
Bench by his side:
To KENT
you are o’ the commission,
Sit you too.

KING LEAR (translation):
I’ll see their trial first. Bring in the evidence.
[To EDGAR]
Judge, take your seat.
[To the Fool]
And you, the fellow judge, sit next to him.
[To KENT]
You’re the judge too, sit down.

EDGAR (original):
Let us deal justly.
Sleepest or wakest thou, jolly shepherd?
Thy sheep be in the corn;
And for one blast of thy manikin mouth,
Thy sheep shall take no harm.
Pur! The cat is gray.

EDGAR (translation):
Let’s judge fairly.
Jolly shepherd, are you sleeping or awake?
Your sheep are in the corn.
If you blow your horn,
the sheep will not be harmed.
Purr! The cat is gray.

KING LEAR (original):
Arraign her first; ‘tis Goneril. I here take my
oath before this honourable assembly, she kicked the
poor king her father.

KING LEAR (translation):
Let’s judge Goneril first. I swear that she kicked me, the king.

Fool (original):
Come hither, mistress. Is your name Goneril?

Fool (translation):
Come here, ma’am. Are you Goneril?

KING LEAR (original):
She cannot deny it.

KING LEAR (translation):
She can’t deny it.

Fool (original):
Cry you mercy, I took you for a joint-stool.

Fool (translation):
I beg your pardon, I thought you were a good person.

KING LEAR (original):
And here’s another, whose warp’d looks proclaim
What store her heart is made on. Stop her there!
Arms, arms, sword, fire! Corruption in the place!
False justicer, why hast thou let her ‘scape?

KING LEAR (translation):
And here’s the other one (Regan), whose distorted face reflects her heart. Stop here! Arms, arms, sword, fire! This place is corrupted! You corrupt judge, why did you let her escape?

EDGAR (original):
Bless they five wits!

EDGAR (translation):
I beg your pardon.

KENT (original):
O pity! Sir, where is the patience now,
That thou so oft have boasted to retain?

KENT (translation):
Oh my god. Where’s your patience that you said you would keep, godfather!

EDGAR (original):
Aside
They’ll mar my counterfeiting.

EDGAR (translation):
Aside
I’m crying and they might notice my acting.

KING LEAR (original):
The little dogs and all, Tray, Blanch, and
Sweet-heart, see, they bark at me.

KING LEAR (translation):
The little dogs, Tray, Blanch, and Sweet-heart, all barking at me.

EDGAR (original):
Tom will throw his head at them. Avaunt, your curs!
Be thy mouth or black or white,
Tooth that poisons if it bite;
Mastiff, grey-hound, mongrel grim,
Hound or spaniel, brach or lym,
Or bobtail tike or trundle-tail,
Tom will make them weep and wail:
For, with throwing thus my head,
Dogs leap the hatch, and all are fled.
Do de, de, de. Sessa! Come, march to wakes and
fairs and market-towns. Poor Tom, thy horn is dry.

EDGAR (translation):
I will take care of them. Shoo!
Whether your mouth is black or white, even if your tooth might have poison,
Whatever the heck you are, I’ll make you cry.
With the throwing of my head, they’ll be scared and run away.
Do-de, de, de. Sessa! Off you go!
Your cup is dry.

KING LEAR (original):
Then let them anatomize Regan; see what breeds
about her heart. Is there any cause in nature that
makes these hard hearts?
To EDGAR
You, sir, I entertain for one of my hundred; only I
do not like the fashion of your garments: you will
say they are Persian attire: but let them be changed.

KING LEAR (translation):
Let them attack Regan and see what happens with her heart. How can there be such a cold-blooded heart?
[To EDGAR]
You can serve me, but I don’t like how you dress; you look like a Persian. Change them.

KENT (original):
Now, good my lord, lie here and rest awhile.

KENT (translation):
Please rest, my king.

KING LEAR (original):
Make no noise, make no noise; draw the curtains:
so, so, so. We’ll go to supper i’he morning. So, so, so.

KING LEAR (translation):
Be quiet and pull the curtains. Yeah like that. We’ll eat in the morning.

Fool (original):
And I’ll go to bed at noon.
Re-enter GLOUCESTER

Fool (translation):
I’ll sleep at noon

[GLOUCESTER re-enters]

GLOUCESTER (original):
Come hither, friend: where is the king my master?

GLOUCESTER (translation):
Hey, come here. Where’s the king?

KENT (original):
Here, sir; but trouble him not, his wits are gone.

KENT (translation):
He’s right here but he’s not quite sane.

GLOUCESTER (original):
Good friend, I prithee, take him in thy arms;
I have o’erheard a plot of death upon him:
There is a letter ready; lay him in ‘t,

GLOUCESTER (translation):
Go get him, please. I heard someone is plotting to kill him. I have a carriage ready so lay him there.


The following section was translated by Kathryn and Joanna.

ACT IV SCENE V Gloucester's castle
Enter REGAN and OSWALD
REGAN: But are my brother's powers set forth?
REGAN: Have my brother's armies been set forth?
OSWALD: Ay, madam.
OSWALD: Yes, ma'am
REGAN: Himself in person there?
REGAN: Is he there himself?
OSWALD: Madam, with much ado: 5
Your sister is the better soldier.

OSWALD: Yes. With all considered, your sister is much stronger.
REGAN: Lord Edmund spake not with your lord at home?
REGAN: Has Lord Edmund not spoken with your lord?
OSWALD: No, madam.
OSWALD: No, madam.
REGAN: What might import my sister's letter to him?
REGAN: What did my sister's letter to him say?
OSWALD: I know not, lady. 10
OSWALD: I don't know.
REGAN: 'Faith, he is posted hence on serious matter.
It was great ignorance, Gloucester's eye being out,
To let him live: where he arrives he moves
All hearts against us: Edmund, I think, is gone,
In pity of his misery, to dispatch 15
His nighted life: moreover, to descry
The strength o' the enemy.

REGAN: I believe it was on a serious matter. It was ignorant of us to take out Gloucester's eyes. But, if he had been left alone, he would have turned people against us wherever he went. I think Edmund has gone, in pity of his father's recent state, to end his misery. And, more so to spy on the enemy.
OSWALD: I must needs after him, madam, with my letter.
OSWALD: I must go after him and give him my letter, madam.
REGAN: Our troops set forth to-morrow: stay with us;
The ways are dangerous. 20

REGAN: Since we're sending our troops tomorrow anyways, stay with us. It's dangerous out now.
OSWALD: I may not, madam:
My lady charged my duty in this business.

OSWALD: I can't madam. My lady trusted me with this business.
REGAN: Why should she write to Edmund? Might not you
Transport her purposes by word? Belike,
Something -- I know not what: I'll love thee much, 25
Let me unseal the letter.

REGAN: Why is she writing to Edmund? Why aren't you passing on her message by word? It's likely she's up to something. I'll appreciate it if you show me the letter.
OSWALD: Madam, I had rather --
OSWALD: Madam, I would like to --
REGAN: I know your lady does not love her husband;
I am sure of that: and at her late being here
She gave strange oeillades and most speaking looks 30
To noble Edmund. I know you are of her bossom.

REGAN: I know your lady doesn't love her husband - I'm sure of that. And when she was here, she gave strange looks and meaningful glances to Edmund. I know you're on it.
OSWALD: I, madam?
OSWALD: Me?
REGAN: I speak in understanding; you are; I know't:
Therefore I do advise you, take this note:
My lord is dead;
Edmund and I have talk'd; 35
And more convenient is he for my hand
Than for your lady's: you may gather more.
If you do find him, pray you, give him this;
And when your mistress hears thus much from you,
I pray, desire her call her wisdom to her. 40
So, fare you well.
If you do chance to hear of that blind traitor,
Preferment falls on him that cuts him off.

REGAN: I know what I'm talking about - I know you are on this. So, I advise you to take this note: My lord is dead and Edmund and I have discussed that it is better if he marries me than Goneril. I hope you give this when you see him. And when you tell your mistress, I hope she doesn't lose her head. So good-bye. And if you hear from that blind traitor, I hope his head is cut off.
OSWALD: Would I could meet him, madam!


Following section was translated by Daniel Oh and JungHee Lee

ACT III SCENE V: Gloucester’s castle.

p. 53

Enter CORNWALL and EDMUND

CORNWALL (original):
I will have my revenge ere I depart his house.
CORNWALL (translation):
I’m gonna revenge before I leave this house

EDMUND (original):
How, my lord, I may be censured, that nature thus
gives way to loyalty, something fears me to think
of.
EDMUND (translation):
I’m scared that I might be criticized for choosing my loyalty for you over my father.

CORNWALL (original):
I now perceive, it was not altogether your
brother’s evil disposition made him seek his death;
but a provoking merit, set a-work by a reprovable badness in himself.
CORNWALL (translation):
Coming to think about it, I think that your brother’s evil intentions, after all, was not because he was a evil man. It’s your father who is so evil.

EDMUND (original):
How malicious is my fortune, that I must repent to
be just! This is the letter he spoke of, which
approves him an intelligent party to the advantages
of France: O heavens! that this treason were not,
or not I the detector!
EDMUND (translation):
What’s wrong with my luck, now that I have to be sorry for being just!! This is the letter he was talking about that says that he was a spy of France. Oh my god, I wish this wasn’t true or I wasn’t the one to discover this!

CORNWALL (original):
o with me to the duchess.
CORNWALL (translation):
Let’s go to the duchess.

EDMUND (original):
If the matter of this paper be certain, you have
mighty business in hand.
EDMUND (translation):
If this letter is true, you really have some heavy business going on.

CORNWALL (original):
True or false, it hath made thee earl of
Gloucester. Seek out where thy father is, that he
may be ready for our apprehension.
CORNWALL (translation):
Whether it’s true or not, you’re now the Earl of Gloucester. Go to your father and let him know that he’s gonna be arrested.

EDMUND (original):
Aside
Stuff his suspicion more fully. –I will persevere
in my course of loyalty, though the conflict be sore
between that and my blood.
EDMUND (translation):
[Aside]
If I find him helping the king, Cornwall will suspect him even more. I’ll act for my loyalty even if that hurts me for betraying my own father.

CORNWALL (original):
I will lay trust upon thee; and thou shalt find a
dearer father in my love.
Exeunt
CORNWALL (translation):
I believe you, and I’ll be a better father than Gloucester.

Exeunt